Is This Underwater Photograph Prove That Amelia Earhart Was Finally Found?

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Is This Underwater Photograph Prove That Amelia Earhart Was Finally Found? : Amelia Earhart’s disappearance occurred during her audacious attempt to become the first female to complete a circumnavigation flight around the globe

Is This Underwater Photograph Prove That Amelia Earhart Was Finally Found?

After nearly 90 years of relentless searching, the famed aviator Amelia Earhart may finally have her mystery solved, as suggested by The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR). The organization points to a 2009 photograph that potentially captures the submerged remnants of an aircraft, believed to be Earhart’s Lockheed Model 10-E Electra.

Amelia Earhart’s disappearance occurred during her audacious attempt to become the first female to complete a circumnavigation flight around the globe. This was just one of her groundbreaking achievements, having previously earned the Distinguished Flying Cross for her pioneering non-stop solo flight across the Atlantic.

On July 2, 1937, Earhart and her navigator, Fred Noonan, were last seen departing from Lae, New Guinea. Their next intended stop was Howland Island, a remote landmass in the central Pacific. The plan was to refuel their Electra there before continuing their historic journey to California.

Regrettably, Earhart and Noonan never reached their destination, plunging the world into a decades-long enigma. While the official U.S. stance attributes their disappearance to the Electra running out of fuel and crashing into the Pacific, alternate theories abound. Many speculate that Earhart and Noonan landed on the barrier reef surrounding Gardner Island, known as Nikumaroro, where they may have encountered large crabs.

Proponents of this theory point to distress signals originating from the region, located approximately 350 nautical miles from Howland Island. Additionally, signs of habitation were noted by U.S. Navy aircraft from the USS Colorado (BB-45) and British colonizers after the Electra’s disappearance. Evidence included bones near a former campfire, airplane fragments, and 1930s-era glass bottles.

In 1991, a piece of metal debris washed ashore on Gardner Island. Initially thought to be from Earhart’s Electra, it was later determined to belong to a World War II-era Douglas C-47 Skytrain, some 30 years after its discovery.

The latest breakthrough in the search for Earhart comes from a 2009 photograph, potentially revealing the Electra’s engine cowl beneath the ocean’s surface. This discovery has reignited efforts by The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, which operates The Earhart Project.

According to Ric Gillespie, the executive director of TIGHAR, the resemblance to an engine cowl and prop shaft was only recognized years later, and the precise location was not documented at the time, leading to unsuccessful attempts to relocate the object.

Currently, the image is undergoing rigorous forensic analysis. While the results may not immediately unveil the fate of Earhart and Noonan, they hold the potential to either confirm or refute the prevailing theories surrounding their enduring disappearance.

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